2022 Perodua Alza X, H and AV variant breakdown – a video guide on which of the MPV's 3 grades to buy – paultan.org

The all-new Perodua Alza is now in showrooms, priced from RM62,500 to RM75,500. We’ve already showed you a full video detailing all the new features and improvements, so now we’re going to breakdown the three different variants of the second-generation MPV, the base X, the mid H and the top AV.

Assuming you’ve already decided on getting the new Alza, then the next big choice is which variant do you go for? Should you save some money and just get the cheapest Alza X for RM62,500, or is the Alza H the best middle ground at RM68,000? Then there’s the Alza AV at RM75,500 – is it worth it paying that much for a Perodua? In the video below, we’ll map out exactly what you get with each variant to help you decide which one is best for you.

Let’s start with the Alza X, the most affordable one. The standard equipment list for the X is actually quite short, but you do get a lot of metal for your money as the second-generation Alza is a fair bit bigger than before. It’s over 200 mm longer, in fact.

Equipment wise, the X gets full LED headlights with automatic high beam. But you will have to turn it on/off yourself as it doesn’t get automatic headlights, and the levelling function is manual as well. The light reflectors are also different, with the X having four separations and the higher spec headlamps having seven segments.

The top line of the headlamps are also plain chrome on the X, with no “eyebrow lights” like on the other variants. Below, you also lose out on the fog lamps, and while the front corner parking sensor eyelets are present here, they’re just dummies. Thankfully, the grille is exactly the same as the H, with the top two bars painted silver and the grille itself in plain black plastic.

Moving on to the side, the most obvious sign that you’ve bought the base Alza are the wheels. The X gets plain silver 15-inch alloys, fitted with Hankook Kinergy Eco2 tyres. The spare tyre under the car is full sized, but you get a steel wheel in the X instead of matching alloys.


Another area that screams budget is the body-coloured B-pillars without the black stickers, which are apparent on lighter colours. The side mirrors, meanwhile, are electrically adjustable, but retracting them is a manual affair. At least, the integrated LED turn signals are similar to what the others get.

One thing to note about the colour options – the Alza is available in five colours: Ivory White, Glittering Silver, Elegant Black, Garnet Red and Vintage Brown. However, red and brown are not available for the X, so do keep that in mind when choosing between variants.

At the back, the X gets full LED tail lamps, matching the more expensive variants. But here, the centre garnish that connects the lights are in plain silver instead of black and chrome in the H/AV. Look closely and you’ll notice that the rear window demister is missing too, but I guess the rear wiper should be enough for most situations. Another odd omission is the lack of proper keyless entry. To unlock, you’ll have to press a button on the key fob like you’re in 2010. But once inside, there’s a keyless push button to start the engine.

There are more differences inside. The cabin is practically all-black, with only the lower steering wheel spokes in silver. There’s not a single button on the steering wheel either, and of course, the rim is in plain poly-urethane. The meter panel is in a traditional two-dial analogue design with a small monochrome MID screen in the centre.

The X head unit is a basic radio with buttons, but you do get Bluetooth connection and a USB port for music, which plays through four speakers. A unique feature is the inclusion of Touch n Go RFID as standard, which replaces the built-in SmartTag in the Myvi.

The rest of the interior is the same as the H, with black fabric seat covers with a diamond pattern. There’s a manual handbrake with a front centre armrest, plus digital air-con controls with memory settings and rear seat-belt indicators. In the back, you get roof-mounted AC vents with blower controls as standard, as well second-row seats that can slide and recline. The one-touch tumble provides easy access to the third-row seats.

The one area that has not been compromised at all, even for this basic spec, is safety. The Alza X gets six airbags as standard, along with electronic stability control, two sets of Isofix child seat anchors as well as Perodua’s Advance Safety Assist (ASA) 3.0. Among others, this suite includes autonomous emergency braking (AEB) and lane departure warning/prevention.

Other brands still have the bad habit of reserving active safety features for their most expensive variants, so this is a very commendable move by Perodua.

Still, I think you would want to spend the extra RM5,500 to get the mid-spec Alza H, because at RM68,000, I think it offers better value overall.


On the outside, the H definitely looks like the more expensive model, especially with the much nicer and larger 16-inch wheels with a dual-tone finish. The tyres are better quality too (Toyo Proxes CR1), and the even spare tyre is upgraded to the same 16-inch alloy wheel and tyre combo.

At the front, the headlamps are self-levelling Adaptive Driving Beam (ADB) units. Besides looking nicer, ADB has better functionalities – it’s an automatic unit (turns itself on when dark), and the adaptive function can keep the high beams on even with oncoming traffic, without blinding them. The top “eyebrows” look good too, and they also double up as sequential turn signals. Very nice.

Further down, the Alza H gets LED foglamps and working front corner sensors. Moving on, the B-pillars are all finished in black, and the side mirrors can now be folded at a push of a button. Round the back, the Alza H looks exactly the same as the AV, with the black and chrome centre garnish. The rear demister is back too, as is a proper keyless entry system with an electrostatic sensor on the driver’s door handle.

Inside, the Alza H is brighter than the full-black X. There’s extra silver trim on the steering wheel, the centre panel and front door cards. The inner door pulls are finished in chrome too. Also, the steering wheel now has buttons to control the audio system, as well as the upgraded 7.0-inch digital instrument cluster ahead.

There’s also a ‘DRIVE’ button to switch between Eco, Normal and Sport driving modes. The steering wheel itself is now wrapped in leather, and the gear lever sports a silver trim. The frame surrounding the centre console is also finished in gloss black now.

The Alza H gets a 9.0-inch touchscreen head unit, with the same tiled interface as the Ativa. Unlike on the SUV though, the screen has USB and HDMI ports on the side, and audio runs through six speakers now, including two tweeters. The screen also displays the reverse camera. The rest of the interior is the same as the X, including the fabric upholstery. One difference is the addition of a second-row centre armrest.


Now, on to the top-of-the-range Alza AV, the one you see in all of Perodua’s marketing materials. This goes for RM75,500, which is RM7,500 more than the H. The range-topper is a little harder to justify, but if your budget can stretch to this, I think you should at least consider the upgrade.

Differences on the outside are quite small, but they are noticeable. The front grille is unique; the AV getting the top bar painted black and the lower trim finished in chrome instead of all-silver. The black frame is also finished in gloss black now, which is much nicer than unpainted plastic in the X/H. You’ll also see a small camera within the grille – that’s part of the 360-degree parking camera system exclusive to the AV.

Also specific to the AV is the chrome window line that stretches all the way back to the D-pillars. Once you’ve noticed this, the plain black bars on the cheaper variants will look unfinished.

Look closely and you’ll also spot the side skirts fitted on the AV, which give the low-slung MPV slightly sportier looks. Another addition are the rear disc brakes over the drum brakes on the H and X. The rear discs are linked to the new electronic parking brake, which replaces the manual handbrake. You also get auto brake hold, which is great for traffic light stops.

Inside, the first thing you’ll notice is the dual-tone dashboard. The lower half of the dash is finished in a dark red, almost brown colour, and it even extends into the door cards. The red tone is also used on the part leather, part fabric seat upholstery. This is done is a far more subtle manner compared to the Myvi AV’s seats, which are more red than black.

In the Alza AV, the centre console is also different. The move from handbrake to EPB allows the use of a higher, more premium-looking centre console, which is finished in gloss black instead of the fake carbon-fibre in the cheaper versions. The higher console also houses a deeper bin under the centre armrest, while the lid itself lined in leather and softer to the touch.

Another difference between the AV and X/H dashboards is the lack of a storage hole in front of the gear lever in the AV, replaced by slim cubby slots on the sides. The left slot has a USB charging port to replace the one in the covered hole.

At the top, the centre air-con vents now have chrome surrounds, while the head unit is different again. The 9.0-inch screen size is the same as the H, but the system itself is completely new. The interface is sleeker, and more importantly, it also supports Android Auto. Apple CarPlay is not available for now, but it may be added on later as an update. Also fitted to the AV is a front dash cam as well as solar/security window tinting from Llumar.

Back to the steering wheel. The AV adds on additional buttons compared to the H, as it is equipped with an Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) system on top of ASA 3.0. Also fitted is Lane Keep Control, and both work together for full Level 2 semi-autonomous driving. The ACC also has a low-speed follow system, which is a form of traffic jam assist. This is a first for Perodua.

That’s not all. The AV bundle also includes blind spot monitoring and rear-cross traffic alert for a complete active safety package.

Lastly, the optional GearUp accessories. You can add on the Prime bodykit package for an extra RM2,500, and this includes the front and rear bodykit, as well as a larger rear spoiler. The front bumper extension also adds LED DRLs into the mix. One thing to note though, as both the Alza X and H do not get side skirts as standard, the Prime bodykit might look a little awkward on those variants.

Inside, there’s a full leather seat cover package for RM1,000 that actually looks pretty good, and there are extra pockets on the front seatbacks too. Other GearUp accessories include window visors, LED scuff plates, coil mats, luggage tray and so on, but be warned, these options are not cheap, and they do add up really quickly. My advise is spend your budget on getting the best variant you can afford, before even looking into the GearUp catalogue.

No matter which variant you choose, the new Alza is powered by a 1.5 litre Dual VVT-i naturally-aspirated engine making 106 PS and 138 Nm of torque, paired to the D-CVT gearbox found in the Ativa and Myvi. Perodua claims that the MPV can achieve up to 22 km/l fuel economy in the Malaysian Driving Cycle, which supposedly reflects local conditions. It’s 18.9 km/l in the more familiar NEDC.

With the 40% better fuel efficiency, Perodua claims that an Alza needs less than RM40 of RON 95 petrol to travel from KL to Penang (358 km), based on the current RM2.05 per litre.

So, that’s our full breakdown of the 2022 Perodua Alza’s three variants, and I hope it can help you decide on which one to buy. Also check out our full launch report and walk-around video for all you need to know about the new Alza. What do you think of the new MPV, its equipment and value?

2022 Perodua Alza 1.5X – RM62,500
Gets as standard:

Mechanicals

  • 1.5L Dual VVT-i engine (2NR-VE) with Eco Idle
  • 1,496 cc, four-cylinder petrol
  • 105 hp at 6,000 rpm, 138 Nm at 4,200 rpm
  • 22 km/l fuel consumption in Malaysian Driving Cycle (18.9 km/l NEDC)
  • D-CVT automatic transmission with manual mode
  • 43-litre fuel tank
  • Electric power steering (EPS)
  • 5.0-metre turning radius
  • Manual handbrake
  • Ventilated brakes discs (front), drum brakes (rear)
  • 4,425 mm long, 1,730 mm wide, 1,660 mm tall (1,670 for X, AV), 2,750 mm wheelbase
  • 150 mm ground clearance (160 mm for X, AV)
  • Five-year/150,000 km warranty

Exterior

  • LED headlights with follow-me home, leaving home function
  • Manual headlight levelling
  • Black power-adjustable door mirrors with manual fold
  • LED side mirror turn signals
  • LED tail lamps with light guides
  • 15-inch alloys with 185/65 Hankook Kinergy Eco 2 tyres
  • Silver-painted front grille
  • RFID

Interior

  • Push start button
  • Speed sensitive auto door lock
  • Fabric seats
  • 60:40 split folding middle row seats, one-touch and slidable mechanism
  • 50:50 split folding third row seats
  • Front arm rest
  • Steering with tilt adjustment
  • Height-adjustable driver’s seat
  • Power windows, auto up/down for driver only
  • Front digital air con controls with memory
  • Rear manual air con controls with vents
  • Analogue meter panel with 4.2-inch LCD multi-info display
  • Non-touchscreen standard head unit
  • Four speakers
  • 137 litre boot (expandable to 498L with third row seats down)
  • Urethane steering wheel

Safety

  • Six airbags
  • ABS, EBD, Brake Assist, Hill-start Assist, VSC, traction control
  • Emergency stop signal
  • Rear parking sensors
  • Advanced Safety Assist (ASA)
  • Pre-collision Warning
  • Pre-collision Braking (AEB, for vehicles and pedestrians)
  • Pedal Misoperation Control
  • Front Departure Alert
  • Lane Departure Warning
  • Lane Departure Prevention
  • Auto High Beam

2022 Perodua Alza 1.5H – RM68,000
Adds on:

Mechanicals

  • Drive modes (Eco, Normal, Power)

Exterior

  • Keyless entry with electrostatic touch sensor
  • Auto retractable door mirrors
  • Auto headlamps
  • LED fog lamps
  • 16-inch two-tone alloys with 195/60 Toyo Proxes CR1 tyres
  • Blacked out B-pillars
  • Chrome bar and trim on front grille
  • Rear demister

Interior

  • 7.0 inch TFT digital instrument panel
  • 9.0 inch touchscreen head unit
  • Leather-wrapped multi-function steering wheel
  • Tweeters, six speakers in total
  • Second row centre arm rest

Safety

  • Reverse camera
  • Front parking sensors
  • Adaptive Driving Beam headlamps with sequential turn signals

2022 Perodua Alza 1.5AV – RM75,500
Adds on:

Mechanicals

  • Electronic parking brake with auto brake hold
  • Rear disc brakes

Exterior

  • Chrome bar and gloss black trim on front grille
  • Chrome window line
  • Side skirts

Interior

  • Semi-leather two-tone seats
  • Two-tone dashboard, front door cards
  • Soft pad centre front armrest
  • 9.0 inch touchscreen head unit with new UI, wired Android Auto

Safety

  • Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop, Hold/Follow function
  • Lane Keep Control
  • Blind Spot Monitor
  • Rear Cross Traffic Alert
  • 360-degree panoramic view monitor
  • Front dashcam
  • Security and solar window tint

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